Research Blog

My work is a print informed experiment. I like to find the meaning of the medium and tinker with its definition.

Trees are more important For evolution than we think

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Consider the fact that we, humans, descended, as monkeys, from the trees. WE EVOLVED IN TREES. Perhaps life evolved as it climbed from the ‘primordial swamp’ into the roots and up the tree…

In my humble opinion, not all amphibians are evolutionarily successful creatures and some, such as a crocodile, are considered to be in an earlier state of evolution (i think they are similar to their dinosaur antecedents). I cannot perceive how crawling out of the water and up the beach would offer diverse opportunities for successful and transitional evolution. I love turtles and crocodiles, but they exemplify my argument!

It makes much more sense if we consider the tree as integral to our evolution. Even in the epoch(s) of the Dinosaurs, the understanding that birds are the current evolutionary relative of dinosaurs, points to the idea that, trees were integral to their evolution as well...

WE EVOLVED IN TREES. If life started in the oceans it makes more sense that mangroves and other intertidal trees became the first habitats for life and the evolution of such life proceeded upwards from there.

Anti-action

 Installation view of Laurie Parsons's  578 Broadway, 11th Floor  1990 at Lorence-Monk Gallery, New York. Courtesy Lorence-Monk Gallery © Laurie Parsons.   “Laurie Parsons went so far as to refuse to include her name on the  invitation to the opening and to remove all reference to the show from  her CV. Four years later, she ceased to produce works altogether.”

Installation view of Laurie Parsons's 578 Broadway, 11th Floor 1990 at Lorence-Monk Gallery, New York. Courtesy Lorence-Monk Gallery © Laurie Parsons.

“Laurie Parsons went so far as to refuse to include her name on the invitation to the opening and to remove all reference to the show from her CV. Four years later, she ceased to produce works altogether.”

I want to coin a new art term: Anti-action.

Anti-action is a term for art practices today that deliberately try to make the impact of their work as slight as possible. This type of work can be sublime.

In its simplicity it considers the human impact on earth, the over saturation images in our world and extreme efficiency. On the Tate Modern website a similar term, Nothing Works, have emptiness as a theme. The Anti-action could be described by the work of American artist Laurrie Parsons empty galleries and her complete cessation of art-making as an artwork.

There are a number of artists working within this theme today. The dematerialised artwork finds its most recognisable form as Performance art, a practice in which the pre-existant body is the only material of the work.

Art

Art could be described as an agent of change, a space where the act of making something predetermines the changes happening in the present moment. Defining this in an art practice can be illusive and almost impossible to determine.

My work grapples with this moment, I call it, "the precipice of the present". I don't pretend to answer any questions but I try to interpret this common state through print, paint, sculpture and performance.

Print ideas

The visual culture of today could not exist without the technologies of printmaking. My work attempts to experiment with lesser known forms of printmaking such as the impression left by a hot iron brand. 


Printmaking is largely miss-understood in a contemporary art context and generally confined to historical processes.

This is my departure point. I see printmaking as potentially the most relevant form of contemporary art, it straddles both traditional and contemporary visual culture. Using a historical knowledge of print and visual production, I acknowledge that printmaking is the origin of our current visual world. All visual technologies derive from the historical processes of printmaking.

Looking towards mass production as a form of printmaking. I primarily produce prints as published pages in popular visual art magazines.

The process of mass produced offset lithography is an updated version of the traditional stone lithograph with this insight I produce my own version of printmaking as mass produced unlimited print editions available at the cost of a magazine.

The aesthetic is text and basic forms, commenting on print and popular culture simultaneously.

I work outside the traditional concepts of unique object exclusivity limited edition and gallery.

My work is an attempt to democratise/inform/play/quote/humour and revitalise printmaking.